June 3, 2020

Five Black-Owned Shops I’m So Glad I Discovered {Part I}

Black-Owned Shops I'm So Glad I Discoveredimage via Ava & Isa

With everything going on in the world, there has been some positive things happening. Many of us, including myself, have been involved in some extremely thought-provoking conversations. I’ve been learning so much and I know that this is only the beginning. I’ve learned more in the past week than I have in a very long time. And I’ve listened to podcasts, read articles, started listening to some audio books and donated to various charities including Black Lives Matter, Justice & Equality Fund and Minnesota Freedom Fund.

Additionally,  in the last couple of days,  I’ve been introduced to some incredible, Black-owned small businesses that I would love to highlight. I’m not sure how I didn’t stumble upon them before – they’re so up my alley!  I may have treated myself to a few of the below things…

Five Black-Owned Shops I’m So Glad I Discovered

Here are five small businesses that really spoke to me:

Black-Owned Shops I'm So Glad I Discoveredimage via Ava & Isa

Ava & Isa:

This children’s wear Etsy shop features the most adorable linen and cotton pieces. Seriously, I want multiple pieces for Sasha. Her shop is currently taking a break to fill orders, but again, I’ll notify you all when she’s back up and running.

Black-Owned Shops I'm So Glad I Discoveredimage via her Instagram

Lolly Lolly Ceramics:

Lately, I’ve developed a new appreciation and love for ceramics and I’m thrilled I’ve been introduced to this shop. Lalese, the talented behind these ceramics, is currently in the process of launching her site. It’s not currently shoppable, but I’ll be keeping a close eye on it and let you know once it is. In fact, the above mug is the first thing I’m planning to get!

Omniwoods image via Omiwoods 

Omiwoods:

These stunning cultural gems are made with fair-trade African gold and globally sourced fine metals. The above necklace might be one of my favorites, but man oh man, there are so many stunning pieces on the site like these earrings.

Pretty Please Teethersimage via her Instagram 

Pretty Please Teethers:

I came across this shop yesterday and was immediately smitten. Filled with beautiful, neutral-colored teethers, rings, pacifier clips and beyond. In fact, I just ordered Sasha this teething lovey! 

Linotoimage via his Instagram

Linoto:

I cannot believe I’m just discovering this linen shop with items ranging from bedding to napkins to tablecloths. Each item chicer than the last and everything made in New York! You can read about the owner, Jason, and his story here.  Personally, I’ve been on the hunt for a really cool tablecloth so I’m planning to order this one.

This is just scratching the surface! So if there are any other black-owned shops that you think I’d love, please share.

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17 comments

  • Alon

    This is awesome! Thank you for sharing!

  • Sel

    Hello Helena, I hope that you and your family are safe. How is little Nate? Is he aware that something is wrong? From Australia, watching events unfold in your homeland is tragic and heart breaking. They are the subject of conversations. Humbly, I think change needs to start at an individual level. When we are born we do not hate, we do not destroy, we do not speak offensively, we do not ridicule, we do not oppress others, we do not steal, we do not bully – we are taught to do that which is good and moral or we are taught to do the opposite. From a young age, my husband and I taught our son to always treat other people in the way that he likes to be treated, he was taught morality, he was taught to examine/reflect on his behaviour and interactions with others and there were consequences for behaviour that was detrimental to him and/or others. Sadly, I think, many countries are in a state of moral decay and there is no moral code or moral excellence. Let’s look at the NYC mayor Bill De Blasio’s response to the actions of his daughter as an example. If she was my child, I would be proud of her for trying to resolve societal injustices. As a parent, however, I would not condone her actions of throwing objects at others as acceptable behaviour, there would be consequences. We live in a world of moral decay – morality is not valued, morality is not upheld, morality is not taught. Anyone who has studied history will be aware that one of the pre-cursors for a civilisation falling is societal moral decay. In this world, who are the just and compassionate teachers of morality? These are my thoughts and I do worry about the world that we are leaving for our children to inherit.

    • Veniceblair

      Hii. This is a very valid point you have and U’re very observant of ur surroundings n this society we live in 2020 in one of the top developed countries. Morality is something some ppl don’t have unfortunately, this comes from many uneducated ill-mannered generations back who didn’t teach their offsprings to be a decent moral educated considered person who have the ability to build a better future, if every person in the world no matter what race, ethnicity, sex or origins they are. If everyone would put a lil efforts to use their brain for what it’s suppose to be use, “for good” then, we wouldn’t be so delay on our civilization, we are super delay on social development and socioeconomic and socioanalytic skills. This is not a problem based on race only. This doesn’t happen just to one single race exclusively, it happens to anyone who doesn’t show or acts like an upperclass citizen, and mostly to ppl who don’t look like an all American Barbie & Ken dolls look alike. This is not something that will get fix in one generation alone, this may start changing slowly with each new generation coming but change it’s a hard thing for humans, being humble and compassionate and a considerate conscious human being is a personal process for everyone no one is except, this is true for both sides’ POV. In a perfect world we wouldn’t need to remind humans of this common sense sinless pure logic, but we all know the saying nothing is ever perfect. Perfection and Beauty are in the eyes of the beholder. New generations are the only ones who will decide the future of humanity. Like any religion or just plain common sense will say, “treat other as U would like to be treated.” How many ppl do this in their daily basis. Ask urself and the ones around u. How are we goin to change if almost no one follows this common sense ways, to live a decent life amongst all humans and animals.

  • Janine

    This is amazing! Thank you for doing this Helena, for using your platform and your reach to not only highlight such an important matter, but to also show ways how to actively support people! I will for sure take a browse and check out these small businesses.
    xx Janine
    https://walkinmysneaks.blogspot.com

  • katie

    These shops are STUNNING!!! Obsessed with the ceramics and the linens!! Thanks for sharing!

  • Ashley Hadley

    Hi Helena! I have followed you since 2012 or so 🙂 As an African American woman I want to tell you this post made my eyes swell up, I cried reading your words, and by the end my heart was full.

    Checking your blog before going into the office, or weekend mornings from bed 🙂 I always expect to see an amazing take on a new trend or traditional staples. So! I went to check out your recent posts to see if you had some “retail therapy” I could partake in…as I’ve been so overwhelmed this week I needed a “break” from things. I needed an moment away from the news, an outlet, because even as a successful black woman-what’s been happening this week to the world has been me and my Family’s entire life.

    So to see this particular post, You found a way to give me both…this was in a sense a refreshing break I needed. To see a white woman I’ve already admired say she’s still growing and learning and go even further to support black businesses just further lets me know (I never doubted) we are all sisters (and brothers). I’ve always admired you and now I respect you for taking the time to share this. Thank you.

    • Kelsey

      I echo Ashley’s sentiments above. As a black woman, I was also touched by this post and the level of detail you shared about each shop. Helena, thank you.

      • Ashley Hadley

        Indeed! Much love, Kelsey 🙂 🙂

  • Mireia

    I love those Lolly Lolly ceramic mugs! Definitely getting myself some!

    Mireia from TGL
    https://thegoldlipstick.com/

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  • Kota EdU enquiry

    nice artical, very knowledgeable and helpful

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  • Tracey Key

    Thanks Helena, I too echo it as an African American Woman thank you for sharing this. I’ve been a long time follower of yours.

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